Math Program Description


APRIL  2010

WHAT IS ESEA TITLE 1?

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act is a federal aid program that disperses monies to our nation’s schools.  Federal funds are given to the states, which are then funneled to the school districts.  Funds are distributed according to a formula based on the number of low-income families.  Regardless of a family’s income, any child eligible for the program can participate.  Title 1 supports supplemental math instruction for grade one at Henniker Community School because that is presently the area of greatest need.

Title 1 is a non-discriminatory, federally funded program passed in 1965.  It provides monetary assistance and guidelines for supplementary instruction for students requiring additional support.  This program provides services for millions of our nation’s children.  More recent changes in the law request added parent participation in both planning and evaluation of Title 1, as well as the development of the District plans.  The focus is to develop a high quality of education for each participant.

Designed to meet District policy and goals, Henniker Community School’s Title 1 Math program supplements regular classroom instruction and presently services 5 students. 

WHY IS TITLE 1 MATH SUPPORT PROVIDED TO ELIGIBLE STUDENTS?

Math is one of the more important subjects taught in the elementary school.  It enables the learner to develop those skills so necessary in today’s world. Problem-solving skills are in especially high demand.

WHAT DOES THE TITLE 1 PROGRAM PROVIDE?  HOW IS IT DESIGNED?

Meeting the individual needs of each child in order to develop competent grade level math skills is always the goal.  A highly qualified teacher assesses the ability of each student, and provides appropriate skills instruction.  The instructor’s tutelage, supplemental to the regular classroom math program is offered in a small group session to better serve the learning styles of each participant.  Many hands-on activities are provided during this session to enable the students to develop an understanding of math concepts.  Students will move from the concrete level, to a pictorial level, and finally the abstract level of mathematics.

WHAT INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES ARE USED:

Title 1 services are provided either within the classroom setting or in a separate Title 1 classroom conducive to understanding the lessons presented.  Children continue to receive basic content math instruction from the regular classroom teacher.  Using diagnostic assessments, the Title 1 teacher organizes students into groups of three to five children, three days a week, for thirty minute periods of supplemental math instruction.  Research based strategies such as the Number Worlds program and the highly successful Singapore Math program are used to develop proficiency in math skills such as number and operations, problem solving, geometry, measurement, functions and algebra, data, statistics, and probability.  Many hands-on activities are incorporated into the sessions.

WHAT ASSESSMENTS ARE USED?  WHAT ARE THE ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS?

A) results of the most recent NWEA Math Test—45%ile or lower

B) history of math difficulties in the classroom, classroom assessments

C) ability to achieve outcomes in the classroom

D) student received services in the past—but still a need

E) student is homeless (automatically qualifies for Title 1)

F) is student receiving other services that address these needs?

WHEN IS A STUDENT READY TO EXIT THE TITLE 1 PROGRAM?

A child no longer need Title 1 services if he/she scores above the 45% ile on the assessments used at his or her grade level.  The classroom/title 1 teacher observes a constant level of improved performance in math skills/assessments.

WHAT CAN I DO AS A PARENT TO ENHANCE MATH SKILLS AT HOME?

During the course of any day, you will encounter situations that require the use of math skills.  Involve your child in cooking activities and help them measure ingredients. Count objects you need to set the table. Cut food into pieces and discuss fractions-half an apple, one-eighth of a pizza etc. Count backward from 10 or 20 when marking off time as a variety of counting forward. Count collections of objects (seashells, rocks etc) by 2’s, or 3’s.  Look for opportunities for addition or subtraction in daily routines such as: “we need 8 balloons for the party, we have 3 blown up, how many more do we need?” or “we have 4 people and 8 cookies, how many does each person get?” Measure how tall the children and parents are. Find patterns in nature. Sand and water play at the beach could include “how many cups will fill this pail?” 

Also, provide your child with the time, space, and materials to complete assignments.  Talk with the classroom and Title 1 teachers to get information about your child’s progress.

WHAT KIND OF BOOKS WOULD BE BENEFICIAL FOR MY CHILD?

There are some good books on the market that enhance math skills.  Check with your local bookstore or check the Scholastic books website,www.scholastic.com for ideas. Scholastic has books such as the M&M or Reese’s Pieces books that encourage counting, addition, subtraction, and multiplication.

WHAT IS MEANT BY A “PUSH-IN” VERSUS A “PULLOUT” PROGRAM?

A “push-in” program offers small group instruction delivered within the regular classroom setting.  A “pull-out” program provides individual and/or small group instruction within the Title 1 classroom.  At times, to best serve the needs of the students, a combination of both models may be used.