Title 1 Program Description


TITLE 1 PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
SEPTEMBER 2010

WHAT IS ESEA TITLE 1?

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act is a federal aid program that disperses monies to our nation’s schools.  Federal funds are given to the states, which are then funneled to the school districts.  Funds are distributed according to a formula based on the number of low income families.  Regardless of a family’s income, any child eligible for the program can participate.  Title 1 supports supplemental reading and /or math instruction for grades two through five at James Faulkner Elementary School.

Title 1 is a non-discriminatory, federally funded program passed in 1965.  It provides monetary assistance and guidelines for supplementary instruction for students requiring additional support.  This program provides services for millions of our nation’s children.  More recent changes in the law request added parent participation in both planning and evaluation of Title 1, as well as the development of the District plans.  The focus is to develop a high quality of education for each participant.

Designed to meet District policy and goals, James Faulkner Elementary School’s Title 1 program supplements regular classroom instruction and presently services a limited number of JFES students based upon funding.

WHY IS TITLE 1 READING SUPPORT PROVIDED TO ELIGIBLE STUDENTS?

Reading is one of the most important subjects taught in the elementary school.  It enables the learner to develop those skills so necessary in every field of learning.  A literate child can better grasp new knowledge, feel confident about progressing to more challenging educational demands, communicate with others, form opinions based on information given, in short, function proficiently in all areas of life.

WHAT DOES THE TITLE 1 PROGRAM PROVIDE?  HOW IS IT DESIGNED?

Meeting the individual literacy needs of each child in order to develop competent grade level reading skills is always the goal.  A highly qualified teacher assesses the ability of each student, and provides appropriate skills instruction.  The instructor’s tutelage, supplemental to the regular classroom reading program is offered in a small group session to better serve the learning styles of each participant.

WHAT INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES ARE USED?

Title 1 services are provided either within the classroom setting or in a separate Title 1 classroom more conducive to understanding the lessons presented.  Children continue to receive basic content reading from the regular classroom teacher.  Using diagnostic assessments, the Title 1 teacher organizes students into groups of three to five children, five days a week, for thirty minute periods of supplemental reading instruction.  Research based strategies such as the Houghton Mifflin Intervention Program, Guided Reading using high interest, appropriate level vocabulary books and Pacing Techniques that develop fluency and comprehension are used to develop proficiency as well as a desire and love for reading within each child.

WHAT ASSESSMENTS ARE USED?  WHAT ARE THE ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS?

A)    results of the most recent NECAP proficiency scores
B)    results of the most recent NWEA Reading Test 40% or lower
C)    history of reading difficulties
D)    ability to achieve outcomes in the classroom
E)     student received services in the past-still a need
F)    is child receiving other services that address his/her needs
G)    is child homeless (automatically qualifies for Title 1)

WHEN IS A STUDENT READY TO EXIT THE TITLE 1 PROGRAM?

A child no longer needs Title 1 services if he/she scores above the 40% on the assessments used at his or her grade level.  The classroom/title 1 teacher observes a constant level of improved performance in reading.

WHAT CAN I DO AS A PARENT TO ENCOURAGE LITERACY AT HOME?

Let your children see you reading and enjoying a book, magazine article or newspaper.  Read together.  Choose books interesting to both of you and share reading.  Modeling, which includes the process by which a book is selected impacts a young reader.  Examine the title and cover, read the summary on the back of the book.  So many beautiful picture books written for mid-elementary and middle school capture the interest quickly.  Do a picture walk, discussing the ability of a picture to relate important information.  Encourage your child to include his/her siblings in the activity.  Read and follow directions for a recipe.  Read a human interest story in the newspaper or a particularly humorous comic strip aloud.  Surround your child with print!  Provide your son/daughter with the time space and materials to complete assignments. Talk with the classroom and title 1 teacher to get information about your child’s progress.

WHY SHOULD I, AS A PARENT, CONTINUE TO READ ALOUD TO MY CHILD EVEN AFTER HE/SHE IS READING INDEPENDENTLY?

Reading aloud helps the listening child to develop more complex vocabulary.  It also allows the opportunity to discuss characters, events and to “read between the lines” or do inferential thinking.  It’s a valuable opportunity for a parent to model fluency and just share ideas about the book.

WHAT KIND OF BOOKS SHOULD BE SELECTED FOR MY CHILD?

A) literature that he/she enjoys- a person is more apt to read if the subject is    interesting or spotlights preferred activities.
B) old favorites that are read and reread to your child by Mom and Dad
C) favorite authors or genres

WHAT IS MEANT BY A”‘PUSH-IN” VERSUS “PULL OUT” PROGRAM?

A “push-in” program offers small group instruction delivered within the regular classroom setting.  A “pull-out” program provides individual and/or small group instruction within the Title 1 classroom.  At times, to best serve the needs of the students, a combination of both models may be used.